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The Best Friend: Dogs Who Became Movie Stars

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allforwomen.inform.click reveals the furry artists we all love

Each of us has favorite actors, and these are not necessarily people. Many furry entertainers make us feel emotions that their two-legged co-stars cannot achieve. Today we decided to talk about the most famous dog actors who did not leave any viewer indifferent.

Film: "White Bim Black Ear"

"Shaggy" actor: English setter named Steve

Probably, there is no person who would remain calm while watching this movie. The touching story of the protagonist and his faithful friend – the dog Bim – makes more than one generation sob in front of the screen, the picture received an Oscar nomination in 1979, and in the USSR it became the best film of the year. The role of Beam was played by an English setter named Steve, however, the entire film crew called the dog Stepa. A deep emotional connection arose between the dog and its on-screen owner, whose role was played by Vyacheslav Tikhonov, which is why the film evoked genuine emotions from the first session. Needless to say, how popular the breed gained in the early 80s!

The Best Friend: Dogs Who Became Movie Stars

Film: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson

"Shaggy" actor: Great Dane named Cyclone

Someone can call this series the most beloved of all in the Soviet series. For the “monster from the swamps", the film crew needed a dog that could inspire horror with its appearance. During the casting, the creators paid great attention to the appearance of the dog: make-up with make-up, and the initial data also played an important role in the final selection. The director watched hundreds of dogs, as a result, a Great Dane was approved for the role. Following the author’s idea, the creators planned to smear the dog with phosphorus, but the idea was not approved by dog ​​handlers – the dog could begin to lick off the substance and get seriously poisoned. "Sherlock" Livanov suggested making a reflective mask for the dog that would be safe for the furry actor. So we got the most terrible “hound of the Baskervilles” in the history of cinema.

The Best Friend: Dogs Who Became Movie Stars

Film: Lassie Comes Home

"Furry" actor: a collie named Pal

In the early forties, the first film about Lassie, based on the book of the same name, was released in the United States. Interestingly, all dogs that have ever played Lassie were males, as they are more mobile and larger than girls. The first dog to receive this role was a male named Pal. The owner bought the dog for five dollars, but the dog turned out to be too active for his family, and therefore the man decided to get rid of the dog by taking him to a screen test. The creators liked the dog so much that it was approved immediately after the trials. After the release of the film, the dog gained immense popularity throughout the country. Abandoned by the owner, Pal now lived no worse than Hollywood stars – in his own apartment, received a fee and worked under a contract for seven hours a day. In especially dangerous scenes, the dog was replaced by an understudy.

Movie: "Commissioner Rex"

"Furry" actor: a German shepherd named BJ

The series, which raised the popularity of the breed to an all-time high level and made breeders all over the world suffer from endless calls wanting to get a "just like in the movie" dog. For all the time, Rex was played by six dogs, the first was the one-year-old BJ, who bypassed more experienced dog actors in the auditions. Before the start of filming, the dog underwent an additional training course, which included training in unusual commands that were necessary to perform stunts on set. However, after a few issues, the dog had to be replaced. The new "Rex" was a dog named Rhett Butler. So that the audience would not notice the change of the dog, the creators put on the dog’s make-up, making it look like its predecessor.

The Best Friend: Dogs Who Became Movie Stars

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